Lumo Review

Posted on May 30 2016 - 6:00pm by Gaf Hussain

lumo

Lumo is unlike any other game I have played, the best analogy I could use would be if Trine was a dungeon crawler. But even then this wouldn’t encapsulate the oddities and whimsy found in this surprising game.

The story of this game is very slim, you are a person who stumbles across a presumably faulty computer that digitises you and inserts you into a digital world. Here you are a little wizard with little to no abilities who must venture through a dungeon that is presented in a floating isometric viewpoint.

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Lumo is unlike any other game I have played, the best analogy I could use would be if Trine was a dungeon crawler, but even then this wouldn’t encapsulate the oddities and whimsy found in this surprising game.

The story of this game is very slim, you are a person who stumbles across a presumably faulty computer that digitises you and inserts you into a digital world. Here you are a little wizard, with little to no abilities, who must venture through a dungeon that is presented in a floating isometric viewpoint.

Lumo seems very simple at first, and if I am honest, quite dull. You simply walk from one room to the other, traversing simple obstacles such as boxes or spikes. But the more you play it, the trickier it becomes. Entering a room can be challenging at times, but leaving it can be even more mind bending. This is game design at its core. There are so many layers, that there are times you feel as though the game has made a mistake or glitched, because you can’t figure out how to progress, but if you look hard enough there is always a way. You unlock new abilities throughout, some as simple as jumping and some more interesting ones later.

There isn’t really any combat in the game, it’s more about traversing, apart from the bonus games. As mentioned before the game is presented in an isometric view, and this makes the more difficult platforming sections incredibly frustrating. Judging the angles of certain jumps is almost impossible, and falling from a high platform after navigating narrow ledges and rope swings is heart-poundingly stressful.

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As soon as you start getting a little bored or tired of the game it throws a curve ball at you and changes completely. I don’t want to spoil all of them but they are a lot of fun and mix up the gameplay.

Lumo has a very British sense of humour with references to UK TV shows like The Crystal Maze, which I doubt will make any impact on global audiences, but it made me chuckle, and the fact that many of them are linked to the trophies means you will likely seek them out.

Many games begin with a proverbial bang, however Lumo is paced really well, it may start off slow but it only gets better. As soon as you think you’ve seen it all, this odd game shows you something else. If you like puzzle games or dungeon crawlers you should try this out.

 

 

RATING
  • Graphics
  • Gameplay
  • Story
  • Replay Value